A Precious Garland of the Supreme Path – Gampopa (Part 5)

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Gampopa
Gampopa

A Precious Garland of the Supreme Path – Gampopa (Part 5)

21. The Ten Bewilderments of Practitioners
1. Not relying upon a guru who properly practices genuine Dharma, but following a smooth-talking charlatan, is extremely bewildered.
2. Not searching out the instructions of the siddhas’ oral lineage but earnestly emphasizing pointless intellectual Dharma is extremely bewildered.
3. Not to pass one’s human life in contenment with whatever appeareances arise at the moment, but to make elaborate plans based on the assumption that hings will remain the same, is extremely bewildered.
4. Not to reflect upon the meaning of Dharma while living alone, but to teach Dharma amidst an extensive retinue, is extremely bewildered.
5. Not to use excess possesions for offering and generousity, but to accumulate wealth and belonging with greed and through deception, is extremely bewildered.
6. Not properly guarding one’s samaya and vows but carelessly letting go of one’s three gates is extremely bewildered.
7. Not familiarizing oneself with realization of the true nature of things, but using uo one’s life with various unimportant activities, is extremely bewildered.
8. Not taming one’s own confusion, but rashly and foolishly attempting to tame the minds of others is extremely bewildered.
9. Not fostering the experience that is born in one’s mind, but cultivating ways to achieve greatness in this life, is extremely bewildered.
10. Now, when aspicious conditions are assembled, not engaging in dilligence but delighting in indolence is extremely bewildered.
Those are the ten bewilderments of practitioners.

22. The Ten Necessary Things.
1. In the beginning, genuine faith arising from fear of birth and death is necessary, like the attitude of a deer that has fled from a trap.
2. In the middle stage, dilligence such that one has no regret at one’s death is necessary like the attitude of a farmer at the harvest.
3. In the end, a happy mind that cannot die is necessary, like the attitude of a person who has completed a great endeavor.
4. In the beginning, a recognition of urgency is necessary, like that of someone pierced by an arrow.
5. In the middle stage, undistracted meditation is necessary, like the intense feelings of a mother whose only child has died.
6. In the end, a recognition that there is nothing to do is necessary, like the attitude of cattle freed by rustlers.
7. In the beginning, the generation of certainty toward Dharma is necessary, like the feeling of a hungry person who encounters good food.
8. In the middle stage, the generation of certainty toward one’s own mind is necessary, like the attitude of the wrestler who acquired the jewel.
9. In the end, the generation of certainty toward nonduality is necessary, like the exposure of an impostor’s deception.
10. The resolution of suchness is necessary, like a raven flying from a ship.
Those are the ten necessary things.

23. The Ten Unnecessary Things.
1. If the mind itself is realized to be empty, hearing and reflection are unnecessary.
2. If awareness is recognized to be stainless, the purification of wrong-doing is unnecessary.
3. If one abides on the natural path, gathering the accumulations is unnecessary.
4. If one cultivates the natural state, meditation upon the path of the method is unnecessary.
5. If one recognizes thoughts to be dharmata, nonconceptual meditation is unnecessary.
6. If the kleshas are recognized to be rootless, reliance upon remedies is unnecessary.
7. If appearances and sounds are recognized as illusory, rejection and creation are unnecessary.
8. If suffering is recognized to be siddhi, searching for pleasure is unnecessary.
9. If one’s own mind is realized to be unborn, transference is unnecessary.
10. If everything one does is for the benefit or others, the accomplishment of one’s own benefit is unnecessary.
Those are the ten unnecessary things.

24. The Ten Superior Things.
1. One human body endowed with freedoms and resources is superior to all other sentient beings of the six types.
2. One person endowed with Dharma is superior to all ordinary people lacking Dharma.
3. This vehicle of the essential meaning is superior to the paths of all other vehicles.
4. One instant of knowledge arising from meditation is superior to all knowledge arising from hearing and reflection.
5. One instant of noncomposite virtue is superior to all the composite virtues that there are.
6. One instant of nonconceptual samadhi is superior to all the conceptual samadhi that there are.
7. One instant of undefiled virtue is superior to all the experiences that arise in one’s mind.
8. The arising of one instant of realization is superior to all the experiences that arise in one’s mind.
9. One instant of unselfconcious conduct is superior to all the self-concious virtuous conduct that there is.
10. Being without fixation on anything whatsoever is superior to all the material generosity that there is.
Those are the ten superior things.

25. The Ten Situations in Which Whatever is Done is Excellent.
1. If an individual whose mind has gone to Dharma abandons activities, it is excellent. If he or she does not abandon them, it is also excellent.
2. If an individual who has cut through superimpositions in the mind meditates, it is excellent. If he or she does not meditate, it is also excellent.
3. If an individual who has cut through entanglement in desirable things acts without passion, it is excellent. If he or she does not act that way, it is also excellent.
4. If an individual who has directly realized dharmata sleeps in an empty cave, it is excellent. If he or she leads a large community, it is also excellent.
5. If an individual who recognizes appearances to be illusory lives alone in retreat, it is excellent. If he or she wanders throughout the land, it is also excellent.
6. If an individual who has attained freedom of mind abandons desirable things, it is excellent. If he or she partakes of them, it is also excellent.
7. If an individual endowed with bodhicitta practices in solitude, it is excellent. If he or she benefits others in a cummunity, it is also excellent.
8. If an individual whose devotion is unfluctuating remains in the presence of his or her guru, it is excellent. If he or she does not remain there, it is also excellent.
9. If for an individual who has heard much and understood the meaning of what he or she has heard, siddhi arise, siddhi arise, it excellent. If obstacles arise, it is also excellent.
10. If a yogi who has attained supreme realization possesses signs of common siddhis, it is excellent. If he or she does not possess them, it is also excellent.
Those are the ten situations in which whatever is done is excellent.

26. The Ten Qualities of Genuine Dharma.
1. The arising in the world of the ten virtues, the six perfections, all emptinesses, the factors of awakening, the four noble truths, the four dhyanas, the four formless absorptions, the ripening and liberating aspects of mantra, and so forth, is a quality of a genuine Dharma.
2. The arising in the world of august lineages of human monarchs, august lineages of brahmins, august lineages of householders, the six types of gods of the desire realm (such as the four great kings), the seventeen types of gods of the form realm, and the four types of formless gods, are qualities of a genuine Dharma.
3. The presence and arising in the world of stream-enterers, once-returners, arhats, prayetkabuddhas, and utterly omniscient buddhas, is a quality of genuine Dharma.
4. The arising of spontaneous benefit of sentient beings by the tow form bodies—self-arisen compassion—until samsara is emptied, due to the power of bodhicitta and aspirations, is a quality of a genuine Dharma.
5. Since all excellent means of sustaining sentient beings appropriately arise through the power of the aspirations of bodhisattvas, these are qualities of genuine Dharma.
6. Since the slight, brief happiness that is experienced in lower mingrations and unrestful states is due to the merit of virtuous actions, this is a quality of a genuine Dharma.
7. When a bad person’s mind turns to genuine Dharma and he or she becomes a holy person, respected by everyone, this is a quality of a genuine Dharma.
8. When someone who, by carelessly engaging in wrong-doing has amassed the causes to become fuel for the fires of hell, turns his or her mind to genuine Dharma and achieves the happiness of higher states and liberation, this is a quality of a genuine Dharma.
9. The delight and respect that all feel for someone who merely has faith in genuine Dharma, or interest in it, or liking for it, or merely retains the costume of it, is a quality of a genuine Dharma.
10. The arising of abundant means of sustenance for those who abandon all possessions and, leaving home, become homeless an hide away in isolated hermitages, is a quality of a genuine Dharma.
Those are ten summaries of the qualities of genuine Dharma.

27. The Ten Things That are Merely Names.
1. Since the nature of the ground is indescribable, ground is merely a name.
2. Since in the path there is nothing to be traversed and no one traversing it, path is merely a name.
3. Since in the way things are there is nothing to be viewed and no viewer, realization is merely a name.
4. Since in the natural state there is nothing to meditate upon and no meditator, experience is merely a name.
5. Since in the ultimate nature there is nothing to be done and no doer, conduct is merely a name.
6. Since ultimately there is nothing to be guarded and no guard, samaya is merely a name.
7. Since ultimately there is nothing to be accumulated and no accumulator, the two accumulations is merely a name.
8. Since ultimately there is nothing to be purified and no purifier, the two obstructions is merely a name.
9. Since ultimately there is nothing to be abandoned and no abandoner, samsara is merely a name.
10. Since ultimately there is nothing to be attained and no attainer, fruition is merely a name.
Those are the ten things that are merely name.

28. The Ten Things That Are Spontaneously Present as Great Bliss.
1. Since the nature of the minds of all sentient beings is the dharmakaya, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
2. Since in the ground, the expanse of dharmata, there are no elaborations of characteristics, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
3. Since in realization that transcends the intellect and is beyond extremes there are no elaborations of division, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
4. Since in experience free from mental activity there are no conceptual elaborations, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
5. Since in effortless conduct free from action there are no elaborations of acceptance and rejection, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
6. Since in the dharmakaya—indivisible space and wisdom—there are no elaborations of apprehended and the apprehending, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
7. Since in the sambhogakaya—self-arisen compassion—there are no elaborations of birth, death, transference, or change, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
8. Since in the nirmanakaya—self arising compassion—there are no elaborations of the perception of dualistic appeareances, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
9. Since in the dharmachakra of the doctrine there are no elaborations of the view of a self or of characteristics, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
10. Since in the activity of boundless compassion there is no partiality or season, it is spontaneously present as great bliss.
Those are the ten things that are spontaneously present as great bliss.
Conclusion
That completes A Precious Garland of the Supreme Path, a collection of the stainless instructions heard from the kind Kadampa gurus of the tradition of the glorious Dipankara [Atisha], father and son [Dromtonpa], acclaimed as the illuminators of the doctrine in the nothern Himalayan region by gurus endowed with undefiled wisdom and by yidams such as Jetsun Drolma; and from the king of Jetsuns, Milarepa, the holder of the heart-nectar of learned siddhas such as Marpa of Lhodrak and the supreme beings Naro and Maitri, as renowned in India as the sun and moon. This was written by Sonam Rinchen, the meditator of Nyi, from Dakpo in the East, a holder of the treasury of the Kadampa and mahamudra instructions.

Colophon
In the words of Lord Gampopa: “I ask all the people of the future who are devoted to me but think they cannot meet me to please read the works I have written, such as A Precious Garland of the Supreme Path and the Ornament of Precious Liberation. It will be no different from meeting me personally. “Since he has said this, you fortunate ones devoted to Lord Gampopa, please be dilligent in the propagation of these texts.